This. Swoon.

This. Swoon.

Blonde 22: Nancy Sinatra
My friend, John (pictured in blue shirt and opening book), generously offered me the above photo for my series on blondes. Circa 1996, Nancy was promoting Frank Sinatra: An American Legend, a book she had written on her dad. Shown here at Toronto’s Yorkville shop, The Book Cellar, John claims she casually whisked her hand back and forth across the non-bearded part of his face. He won’t go so far as to say she was flirting though.

Blonde 22: Nancy Sinatra

My friend, John (pictured in blue shirt and opening book), generously offered me the above photo for my series on blondes. Circa 1996, Nancy was promoting Frank Sinatra: An American Legend, a book she had written on her dad. Shown here at Toronto’s Yorkville shop, The Book Cellar, John claims she casually whisked her hand back and forth across the non-bearded part of his face. He won’t go so far as to say she was flirting though.

Blonde 21: Grace Kelly
“Blondes make the best victims. They’re like virgin snow that shows up the bloody footprints."  —Alfred Hitchcock 
(Thanks to both http://emk-irl.tumblr.com/ and Damian Rogers for the suggestion.)

Blonde 21: Grace Kelly

Blondes make the best victims. They’re like virgin snow that shows up the bloody footprints." Alfred Hitchcock

(Thanks to both http://emk-irl.tumblr.com/ and Damian Rogers for the suggestion.)

Blonde 20: Sarah Jessica Parker

I really hope blondes aren’t reacting to my book like this.

thehairpin:

“Greta Garbo did not inhabit this earth. She flitted about in the celluloid heavens, showing her face and, later, offering her voice at sporadic intervals. Her skin was flawless, the arch of her eyebrow was perfection. She was never a child, she never aged. She didn’t cry, and laughed so rarely that when it happened onscreen, the studio focused entire publicity campaigns around it.
She was never Greta; she was always Garbo. And she must be seen — projected, larger-than-life, on the big screen — to be believed.
Garbo is one of the remaining enigmas of Hollywood history: did she love men? Women? Both? Did she turn her back on Hollywood? Did she truly ‘want to be alone’? Was she a figment of Hollywood’s imagination, the product of light and mirrors, or a woman in control of her own destiny? To me, she is pure cinema: the most exquisite alchemy of light, celluloid, and the human form.”
Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Exquisite Garbo | The Hairpin

thehairpin:

“Greta Garbo did not inhabit this earth. She flitted about in the celluloid heavens, showing her face and, later, offering her voice at sporadic intervals. Her skin was flawless, the arch of her eyebrow was perfection. She was never a child, she never aged. She didn’t cry, and laughed so rarely that when it happened onscreen, the studio focused entire publicity campaigns around it.

She was never Greta; she was always Garbo. And she must be seen — projected, larger-than-life, on the big screen — to be believed.

Garbo is one of the remaining enigmas of Hollywood history: did she love men? Women? Both? Did she turn her back on Hollywood? Did she truly ‘want to be alone’? Was she a figment of Hollywood’s imagination, the product of light and mirrors, or a woman in control of her own destiny? To me, she is pure cinema: the most exquisite alchemy of light, celluloid, and the human form.”

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Exquisite Garbo | The Hairpin

Blonde 19: Kristen Bell
"My mom gave her highlights for free, streaking her hair…. But Larissa wouldn’t let Mom cut her hair. She was very particular about that.” —from The Blondes

Blonde 19: Kristen Bell

"My mom gave her highlights for free, streaking her hair…. But Larissa wouldn’t let Mom cut her hair. She was very particular about that.” —from The Blondes

Blonde 18: Jodie Foster
"Farther down the platform, although I can’t say for sure, I thought I heard the words cat fight. The people behind me were muttering, rationalizing.” —from The Blondes

Blonde 18: Jodie Foster

"Farther down the platform, although I can’t say for sure, I thought I heard the words cat fight. The people behind me were muttering, rationalizing.” —from The Blondes

"We’re our own worst enemies a lot of the time; but I still blame men."
—Janeane Garofalo

"We’re our own worst enemies a lot of the time; but I still blame men."

—Janeane Garofalo

Blonde 17: Etta James

I think the song complements the themes of my book. Tell Mama, indeed!

Blonde 16: Madonna
"When she saw me, she froze as if she’d been caught at something. She was tall and pink-skinned with a short tufted hairstyle the colour of vanilla ice cream—one of those girls who’d gone all the way with the retro fifties look… I was standing there when the girl suddenly reached out and punched the lid of the garbage can. It swung on its hinge, screeching. I backed away, grabbing for the door handle, but the girl pushed past me, mad-eyed." —from The Blondes

Blonde 16: Madonna

"When she saw me, she froze as if she’d been caught at something. She was tall and pink-skinned with a short tufted hairstyle the colour of vanilla ice cream—one of those girls who’d gone all the way with the retro fifties look… I was standing there when the girl suddenly reached out and punched the lid of the garbage can. It swung on its hinge, screeching. I backed away, grabbing for the door handle, but the girl pushed past me, mad-eyed." —from The Blondes